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What I learned from watching the first 10 minutes of 500 movies

Mike D’Angelo gives a film 10 minutes to capture his attention otherwise he movies on. Here’s what he learned going through 500 movies.

10 minutes

Film critics watch a lot of movies, but we can’t watch everything. With approximately seven weeks left in 2015, I’ve seen (as of the day I’m writing this) 204 features that have been commercially released this year. That’s kind of a staggering number, but it’s less than a quarter of the truly staggering 857 features that have played at least a week-long run in New York City since January 1. When I vote in various year-end polls, I’m always acutely aware of the likelihood that I’ve missed something I’d have loved, even though I make a point of seeking out every film that gets strong reviews. There’s just not enough time to sit through it all.

A few years ago, I started making an effort to give some of the also-rans a chance, by watching as many of them as is feasible (once they’re viewable at home) in what I call sampling mode. Basically, I give the movie 10 minutes to grab my attention. Most of them fail, and get turned off at that point. If I’m still interested, though, I’ll watch for another 10 minutes. There are two more potential bail-out points at 0:30 and 0:40; if I still want to keep going after 40 minutes, I commit to watching the entire film, even if it turns awful later.

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What would happen if you didn’t sleep?

In the United States, it’s estimated that 30 percent of adults and 66 percent of adolescents are regularly sleep-deprived. This isn’t just a minor inconvenience: staying awake can cause serious bodily harm. Claudia Aguirre shows what happens to your body and brain when you skip sleep.

This video is dedicated to Dennis who works tirelessly behind the scenes.

No Sleep

The 116 images NASA wants aliens to see

Here are all the photos flying through interstellar space on Voyager’s Golden Record.

When Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 launched into space in 1977, their mission was to explore the outer solar system, and over the following decade, they did so admirably.

With an 8-track tape memory system and onboard computers that are thousands of times weaker than the phone in your pocket, the two spacecraft sent back an immense amount of imagery and information about the four gas giants, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

But NASA knew that after the planetary tour was complete, the Voyagers would remain on a trajectory toward interstellar space, having gained enough velocity from Jupiter’s gravity to eventually escape the grasp of the sun. Since they will orbit the Milky Way for the foreseeable future, the Voyagers should carry a message from their maker, NASA scientists decided.

The Voyager team tapped famous astronomer and science popularizer Carl Sagan to compose that message. Sagan’s committee chose a copper phonograph LP as their medium, and over the course of six weeks they produced the “Golden Record”: a collection of sounds and images that will probably outlast all human artifacts on Earth.

Voyager

 

Gaspar Noé Talks Love, 3D Sex, Drugs, and Intimacy

Six years after his groundbreaking, psychedelic epic ‘Enter The Void’, French Argentinian provocateur Gaspar Noé is back with his latest film – the shot in 3d, (very) sexually explicit ‘Love’. The story follows film student Murphy (Karl Glusman) who enters a intensely passionate relationship with the unstable Electra (Aomi Muyock) as they invite their attractive neighbor (Klara Kristin) into their bed. We sat with Noé to discuss the film’s range of critical reactions, working with non-actors performing actual sex and his process in creating one of year’s most controversial films.

Gaspar Noe

Watch the Filming of the Largest Film Stunt Explosion Ever from the Set of Spectre

SPECTRE has been awarded a Guinness World Records™ title for the Largest Film Stunt Explosion. Producer Barbara Broccoli, Daniel Craig and Léa Seydoux, accepted the record certificate in Beijing, China on behalf of winner Chris Corbould, who served as Special Effects and Miniature Effects Supervisor on SPECTRE. The explosion was filmed in Erfoud, Morocco and used 8418 litres of fuel and 33kg of explosives.

Spectre Explosion

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