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Screenwriting

A Study of the “Warrior” Character Archetype

Scott Myers dissects several “Warrior” characters in order to look for patterns and assist in creating stronger characters in screenplays. Naturally the Warrior character type is about fighting, their stock-in-trade. But for whom do they fight? How? And most important… why? The answer to these questions define the very nature of the Warrior… or perhaps Read MoreRead More

Improvising Screenplays: Writing Great Movie Loglines Using the Improv Concept of ‘Game’

In Improvising Screenplays, improvisational actor Brett Wean shares how the concepts of improvisation can be applied to the work — and play — of writing your script. In my last column, I introduced the concept of “game,” used by improvisational actors to provide structure to a scene. Game enables improvisers to hone in on a Read MoreRead More

Exposition: Do modern audiences want less of it in stories?

In his class on Exposition, Scott Myers discusses how modern audiences have less patience for overt exposition. Just in general, I think modern audiences need less exposition than they used to. We see this with the compression of events in what comprises a typical Act One in contemporary scripts. If you go back and watch movies from Read MoreRead More

Terence Winter – The Screenwriter who wrote The Wolf of Wall Street

Famous and revered for his work on The Sopranos and Boardwalk Empire, Terence Winter is a 1st time Oscar nominee for his screenplay for The Wolf of Wall Street. He talks to David Poland about how he ended up in ScorseseLand after law school, odd jobs, and writing for Flipper & Xena. Also, what does Read MoreRead More

What is the Difference Between an Homage and Plagiarism?

Scott Myers gives us his take on the whole homage vs. plagiarism debate as he tackles a reader’s question. Let’s start with a definition. Per our good friends at Wikipedia: “Homage is a show or demonstration of respect or dedication to someone or something, sometimes by simple declaration but often by some more oblique reference, Read MoreRead More

Script Development for the Beginner Writer-Director

Kim Garland offers 5 steps for the beginner writer-director based on her own experience developing her first script turned film. 1) BEGIN AS A SCREENWRITER When you’re first developing your script, give yourself the freedom to think like a screenwriter and not a director. You’ll have plenty of time in later drafts to reign in the Read MoreRead More

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