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Finding the Cosmic Smiley Face

This image isn’t photoshopped – its the effect of gravitational lenses (think the blackhole of Interstellar). This wonder sat in the Hubble Telescope archives for three years until some amateur spotted it. There’s a saying that goes “Smile, and the world will smile back”. In this case it was the universe that smiled back, as Read MoreRead More

George Eastman House Presents the History of Photography

The George Eastman House presents a 12 part series that covers the science of photography from the first experiments up to digital photography. Chapter 1 - Before Photography Chapter 2 - The Daguerreotype Chapter 3 - Talbot’s Processes Chapter 4 - The Cyanotype Chapter 5 - The Collodion Chapter 6 - The Albumen Print Chapter 7 - The Platinum Print Chapter 8 Read MoreRead More

Yahoo Labs’ Algorithm Identifies Creativity in 6-Second Vine Videos

Search engines are trying to use algorithms to analyze the creative content of Vine Videos. In January 2013, a video sharing service called Vine suddenly hit cyberspace. The service, owned by Twitter, was unique because users were allowed to record and share videos that were no more than six seconds long. But within months, it Read MoreRead More

Interstellar: inside the black art

Mike Seymour gets deep into the Visual effects of Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar including the creation of the black hole, giant tidal waves, and how to cinematically depict the four dimensional cube that is the Tesseract. Artists are often asked to produce images of things never seen before, and often times asked to make them look real Read MoreRead More

Astronaut – A journey to space

What does astronaut see from up there? From the red soil of africa, the blue water of oceans, to the green lights of the poles and yellow light of human activity, discover, through this journey to space, something astoundingly beautiful and strange at the same time. by Guillaume JUIN I wanted to do something different from Read MoreRead More

Watch Astronauts Suspend a GoPro in a Bubble of Water

During Expedition 40 in the summer of 2014, NASA astronauts Steve Swanson and Reid Wiseman — along with European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst — explored the phenomenon of water surface tension in microgravity on the International Space Station. The crew “submerged” a sealed GoPro camera into a floating ball of water the size of Read MoreRead More

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