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Filmmaking 360

Behind the Scenes of “I Love Lucy” – 1953

Go behind the scenes of “I Love Lucy” – the television show that would set the model for practically all live studio audience sitcoms since. Video Description “I Love Lucy” is an American television sitcom starring Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance, and William Frawley. The black-and-white series originally ran from October 15, 1951, to Read MoreRead More

Building a Brand – Never Stop Asking “Why?”

People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but they will remember what you made them feel. That line of thought by Maya Angelou has guided Legendary designer Michael Wolff over his long career. Check out more in this interview from 99u. We won’t remember the commercial, the logo, or the Read MoreRead More

Fear on Film Roundtable with David Cronenberg, John Carpenter and John Landis (1982)

In 1982, while working at Universal studios as a publicity and marketing specialist in the horror and science fiction genre, Mick Garris produced and hosted this 26 minute roundtable discussion between David Cronenberg, John Carpenter and John Landis. All three were working on projects at Universal at the time and this piece was originally created Read MoreRead More

Gary Vaynerchuk: How to Tell Stories in an A.D.D. World

In world with Vine, Snapchat, and Twitter, how can creatives capture attention to make their voices heard? In this 99U talk, best-selling author and founder of VaynerMedia Gary Vaynerchuk breaks down how our work can cut through our current “A.D.D. Culture” — One where we binge-watch entire television seasons in one sitting and prefer texting Read MoreRead More

Shinichi Sekizawa: The Guy Behind the Man in the Suit

Without Shinichi Sekizawa, Godzilla would have remained a thinly veiled commentary on nuclear war. But Godzilla’s icon status was cemented only after he because an absured and goofy character.  David Kalat follows the little known story of Shinichi Sekizawa, the writer responsible for Godzilla’s star turn. To pretend that Godzilla movies did not veer into Read MoreRead More

The Most Powerful Piece of Film Criticism Ever Written

Noah Berlatsky reflects on James Baldwin’s The Devil Finds Work, a book-length essay on race and America and cinema which movingly demonstrates that analysis of art can be art itself. Who’s the greatest American movie critic? A lot of folks probably would say Pauline Kael or David Bordwell or Manny Farber; some might argue for more academic Read MoreRead More

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