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Filmmaking 360

‘Birdman’s’ Times Square Scene: How They Did It

They couldn’t afford to shut down Times Square – so the crew of Birdman just shot it with normal tourists. Much has been made of “Birdman” director/co-writer Alejandro G. Inarritu’s conceit of making a movie that seems to be one continuous, two-hour shot. The actual filming consisted of long takes edited to look seamless. Each sequence Read MoreRead More

How Are Oscar Nominees Chosen?

It’s a complicated affair – Sean Hutchinson explores how the Academy picks its nominees. The voting process that determines which films and actors become Oscar nominees is a long and complicated undertaking that involves more than 6000 voting members and hundreds of eligible films, actors, actresses, directors, cinematographers, editors, composers, and more. To even be Read MoreRead More

Pablo Ferro on Making The Titles for Dr. Strangelove

Title Designer PABLO FERRO speaks about his work on Dr. Strangelove. I was doing commercials and I created a new way to cut and that’s why I got popular. That’s how Stanley [Kubrick] saw my work. He saw my reel and he loved it. He said, “I would like you to do the trailer for Strangelove because Read MoreRead More

Symmetry in Wes Anderson’s Editing

Max Tohline examines the symmetry in a scene from The Grand Budapest Hotel. The more films Wes Anderson directs, the more tightly structured and precise each aspect of his style becomes. He’s long favored neat centering and symmetry in his compositions (as shown in this oft-viewed Staff Pick supercut: vimeo.com/89302848). Recently on rewatching The Grand Budapest Hotel, Read MoreRead More

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