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Listen to Original Rejected Score of 2001: A Space Odyssey

Take a listen at what could have been the score to Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey by Alex Smith before the director decided to go with a more classical score. In the early stages of production, Kubrick had commissioned noted Hollywood composer Alex North, who had written the score for Spartacus and also worked on Dr. Strangelove, to write the score Read MoreRead More

How a Chant from 600AD found its way into Lord of the Rings, The Lion King, and Star Wars

One of the world’s oldest songs isn’t about love, sex or even power. It’s about death. Dies Irae, the song of death, is a medieval chant that warns of an apocalyptic day of wrath, and has been used as the soundtrack to the end of life for 40 human generations — from the dark ages Read MoreRead More

Crime Jazz: How Miles Davis, Count Basie & Other Jazz Legends Provided the Soundtrack for Noir Films & TV

Film Noir is an unmistakable genre yet also incredibly difficult one to define. Beyond the visual chiaroscuro images, Noir can best be invoked through music – the hard bop sounds of 1950s jazz from Miles Davis that came to define urban cool.   When we think of film noir, we tend to think of a Read MoreRead More

The Sound of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

In this exclusive SoundWorks Collection sound profile we visit Park Road Post Studios in Wellington, New Zealand to talk with the sound team of Director Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug. Featured interviews include Re-recording Mixer Michael Hedges, Re-recording Mixer Chris Boyes, Re-recording Mixer Michael Semanick, Re-recording Mixer Gary Summers, Composer Howard Shore, Read MoreRead More

Danny Elfman’s score tied Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure together—and launched a career

Mike D’Angelo revists the score of Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure and how the circus-like theme launched Danny Elfman’s career. The first time I saw Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, during its initial theatrical run in summer 1985, it took less than a minute to grab me. Visually, nothing happens during the film’s first 60 seconds—it’s just a spare opening-credits sequence, white Read MoreRead More

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