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Behind the scenes – 2015 Sundance Film Festival with Chief Entertainment Photographer Larry Busacca

Go behind the scenes at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival with Getty Images Chief Entertainment Photographer Larry Busacca. With a steady stream of celebrities coming through the Getty Images portrait studio, Busacca is tasked with capturing unique portraits of the stars and ensemble casts.

See what it takes to capture these unique portraits and not keep the next A-list celebrity waiting for their turn (hint: a great crew, enthusiastic talent and a whole lot of love for your job).

Sundance-Portraits

The Quadrant System of “Drive”

Every Frame a Painting analyses the quadrant system of composition from Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive

Now is the Refn really walking around on set composing shots with a quadrant – absolutely not. But the quadrant approach is another way to think about composition and a way to analyse a scene – another tool for the toolbox.

Drive-Quadrant

Hyperrealism, Mumblecore, & “Togetherness” – VICE Meets the Duplass Brothers

Filmmakers Jay and Mark Duplass have made a big name for themselves with the endearing hyperrealism of their mumblecore films. The brothers have now delved into the world of TV with their series Togetherness, which follows the tribulations of thirtysomethings trying to make sense of their adult lives.

Jay-and-Mark-Duplass

Variety Artisans: Oscar Ballot Guide – Visual Effects

Visual effects are often called a “tech” category, but after you look at the vfx Oscar nominees and hear from vfx supervisors Joe Letteri (“Dawn of the Planet of the Apes”) and Paul Franklin (“Interstellar”), you’ll see that visual effects are truly an art — and know better how to spot the best work.

VFX

A Look at the Camera Cart Used at the Super Bowl

Here’s a quick look at the Rolling camera cart that’s running along the sidelines at the big game.

Camera-Cart

Adam Savage Visits the Hollywood Costume Exhibition

Adam Savage explores the incredible Hollywood Costume exhibition currently on display at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles with his friend and exhibit curator Deborah Nadoolman Landis–the designer of Indiana Jones’ iconic costume. They discuss the role of the costume design in cinematic storytelling and the wonderful stories behind some of the 150 costumes on display.

Costume-Exhibit

How one of the best films at Sundance was shot using an iPhone 5S

The title of this article is gimmicky at best – but the real story of Sean Baker’s Tangerine isn’t about being a gimmick – it’s about telling your story no matter what. The big take away in Baker’s words: ”You can make a beautiful-looking film on a shoestring budget, but you have to know 100 years worth of filmmaking.”

Tangerine

Tangerine, a breakout hit from this year’s Sundance Film Festival, is full of surprises. There’s the subject matter: transgender prostitutes working in a not-so glamorous part of Hollywood. And there are the characters: flinty, funny, nobody’s victim. But the story behind the camera is as surprising as what’s in front of it. Particularly because the camera used to shoot Tangerine was the iPhone 5S.

Plenty of amateur films have been shot using iPhones, but by all reports, this is the first movie at the Sundance Film Festival to be shot almost entirely on an Apple device. It was a decision that indie writer and director Sean Baker made to accommodate the film’s small budget. But you’d never guess the camera, to look at it: Tangerine was shot in a widescreen, 2:35:1 aspect ratio, and its camera zooms through the streets of LA with a fluidity you’d never expect from a handheld device. And yet despite his camera of choice, Baker says the iPhone made for a good partner. “It was surprisingly easy,” Baker says. “We never lost any footage.”

So how do you make a Sundance movie for iPhone? You need four things. First, of course, the iPhone (Baker and his team used three). Second, an $8 app called Filmic Prothat allowed the filmmakers fine-grained control over the focus, aperture, and color temperature. Third, a Steadicam. “These phones, because they’re so light, and they’re so small, a human hand — no matter how stable you are — it will shake. And it won’t look good,” says Baker. “So you needed the Steadicam rig to stabilize it.”

The Verge | Read the Full Article

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