A Widow’s Threats, High-Powered Spats and the Sony Hack: The Strange Saga of ‘Steve Jobs’

Laurene Powell Jobs pressured Leonardo DiCaprio, Christian Bale and every studio in Hollywood to not make the movie. David Fincher wouldn’t budge off his $10 million fee. Now, THR talks to the creative team — Danny Boyle, Aaron Sorkin, Michael Fassbender, Kate Winslet and more — behind the most anticipated, controversial biopic in years.

Steve Jobs Group

On Sept. 28, 2011, Sony Entertainment CEO Michael Lynton left his Culver City office and made the four-and-a half-mile trek to Century City, ready to open his wallet.

Lynton, along with producer Mark Gordon (Saving Private Ryan), was being given a unique opportunity to read one of the most anticipated manuscripts in publishing history: Walter Isaacson’s biography Steve Jobs.

The brilliant but mercurial founder of Apple Inc. was on his deathbed — he would die days later, on Oct. 5 — and Simon & Schuster was rushing the book into stores, which meant the publisher did not want it read widely in advance of its Oct. 24 release: Secrecy was crucial to giving Steve Jobs the type of splash that would propel it to sales of more than 379,000 copies during its first week alone. And so Lynton and Gordon closeted themselves for hours in separate offices at ICM Partners, Isaacson’s agency, and waded through the 656-page tome.

The Hollywood Reporter | Read the Full Article

A ‘Star Trek’ Dream, Spread From Upstate New York

To celebrate of Gene Roddenberry’s legacy, James Cawley founded a non profit 12 years ago to faithfully produce new episodes of the original in Star Trek New Voyages.

James Cawley Star Trek

Capt. James T. Kirk writhes in pain, having been tortured at the hands of his Klingon captors, as his shocked and saddened crew members speed away toward unknown parts of the universe, presuming Kirk is dead after his mysterious disappearance.

The action might have once unfolded at Desilu Studios in Hollywood, where the original “Star Trek” series was filmed, but it happened in a former dollar store on the main street of this upstate town, best known for its 18th century stone fort where a part of the Revolutionary War was contested over 200 years ago.

It was a sequence for “Star Trek: New Voyages,” a project inspired by the childhood passion that James Cawley, the show’s executive producer, had for the 1960s science-fiction television series. Episodes, which are only available online, feature a handful of professional actors in lead roles (including Brian Gross as Kirk and Brandon Stacy as Spock) and volunteers who do whatever is needed to keep the spirit of Star Trek alive. George Takei, the actor who played Sulu in the original series, made a cameo appearance in an episode titled “World Enough and Time.”James Cawley 

The New York Times | Read the Full Article

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