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Inside the House from “The Royal Tenenbaums”

From the AV Club: The Royal Tenenbaums is set in New York, but not really. The city viewers see in the film certainly looks like New York, but the names have been changed and, in at least one case, an iconic landmark covered up. Consequently, the house that Royal Tenenbaum (Gene Hackman) bought in the winter of his 35th year is located on Archer Avenue in the film, not in Harlem on Convent Avenue at 144th Street, as it is in real life.

Why David Lynch Turned Down ‘Return of the Jedi’

David Lynch was offered to direct the third Star Wars film, Return of the Jedi, but turned it down. Why? Spoiler.. Wookies give him headaches.

Sidenote from Sascha Ciezata the creator of the video above:

My immensely popular animated short film “When Lynch Met Lucas” was pulled off Vimeo and several other sites by a certain “organization” (who claims to support the arts and artists) with a rather nebulous claim that they own the copyright to the audio portion of my film. Here is another animated short, again shot with my iPhone about the whole absurd affair….

100 Resources to Research Your Horror Film

Have you ever felt that you have a great horror story and you just need to do a little research to get more ideas, get the time period right or other facts? Maybe you have writer’s block and don’t know where to start. In either case we put together a list of links to help you get all the details right in your scary flick.

Crime

Urban Legends

Ghosts & Folklore

Public Domain and Classical Horror Stories

Online Screenplays

Horror Movie Websites

Articles

What you Brain looks like in the Uncanny Valley

The uncanny valley is a hypothesis in the field of robotics and 3D computer animation, which holds that when human replicas look and act almost, but not perfectly, like actual human beings, it causes them to appear creepy. Researchers at University of California, San Diego have scanned the brains of individuals visiting the “valley” to try to understand why they freak us out.

Published in the Oxford University Press journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, the functional MRI study suggests that what may be going on is due to a perceptual mismatch between appearance and motion…

According to their interpretation of the fMRI results, the researchers say they saw, in essence, evidence of mismatch. The brain “lit up” when the human-like appearance of the android and its robotic motion “didn’t compute.”

“The brain doesn’t seem tuned to care about either biological appearance or biological motion per se,” said Saygin, an assistant professor of cognitive science at UC San Diego and alumna of the same department. “What it seems to be doing is looking for its expectations to be met – for appearance and motion to be congruent.”

In other words, if it looks human and moves likes a human, we are OK with that. If it looks like a robot and acts like a robot, we are OK with that, too; our brains have no difficulty processing the information. The trouble arises when – contrary to a lifetime of expectations – appearance and motion are at odds.

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