Menu 

Do Film Buffs Make Better Filmmakers?

Martin Scorsese, Quinton Tarantino, Steven Spielberg, Jim Jarmusch, Chris Nolan, Michael Haneke, Win Wenders, Jean Luc Godard etc. all film buffs, but does it have anything to do with their success?

Film Buffs

As pointless of a question it may seem, it is one that has been roaming around several cinephile circuits for a while now and one I have been contemplating myself.

I think the more practical question would be “what advantages would a film buff have that a casual enthusiast wouldn’t?”

Obviously an awareness of a mediums history would be beneficial in all crafts, even if the reimbursements are hedonistic. However you could assume one of the most effective conducts that help comprehend the functionality of cinematic technique, is to understand why the techniques were used in the first place.

It could be compared to how contemporary biologists, geneticists and palaeontologists research into the evolutionary history of the natural world. They attempt to understand an organism or a specific biological function by outlining how it reached its status in the first place. Natural selection and cinema are very similar in regards to their gradual trial and error practises (techniques that worked, continued and the ones that did not fell into extinction). Of course this is an over simplification of both natural selection and cinema, but what should be taken from this is the notion that to gain a better understanding you must be aware of the experiments of the past.

I believe the reason most dialogue sequences shares resemblances (the over the shoulder sequences is a prime example) is a result of film-makers adhering to a contemporary convention. It is not about the effect over the shoulder sequences create, but an act of conforming to a film making consensus. How can cinema be fully utilised and evolve if film-makers are not conscious of their own techniques effects?

As pointless of a question it may seem, it is one that has been roaming around several cinephile circuits for a while now and one I have been contemplating myself.

I think the more practical question would be “what advantages would a film buff have that a casual enthusiast wouldn’t?”

Obviously an awareness of a mediums history would be beneficial in all crafts, even if the reimbursements are hedonistic. However you could assume one of the most effective conducts that help comprehend the functionality of cinematic technique, is to understand why the techniques were used in the first place.

It could be compared to how contemporary biologists, geneticists and palaeontologists research into the evolutionary history of the natural world. They attempt to understand an organism or a specific biological function by outlining how it reached its status in the first place. Natural selection and cinema are very similar in regards to their gradual trial and error practises (techniques that worked, continued and the ones that did not fell into extinction). Of course this is an over simplification of both natural selection and cinema, but what should be taken from this is the notion that to gain a better understanding you must be aware of the experiments of the past.

I believe the reason most dialogue sequences shares resemblances (the over the shoulder sequences is a prime example) is a result of film-makers adhering to a contemporary convention. It is not about the effect over the shoulder sequences create, but an act of conforming to a film making consensus. How can cinema be fully utilised and evolve if film-makers are not conscious of their own techniques effects?

Black Country Cinema | Read the Full Article

Live. Die. Repeat the Effects of “Edge of Tomorrow”

In this in-depth look at Doug Liman’s time-splicing Edge of Tomorrow, FXGuide talks to Sony Pictures Imageworks, Framestore, Cinesite, The Third Floor and Prime Focus World about how they helped orchestrate some of the film’s biggest effects and its previs and stereo conversion – including complicated (and crazy) tentacled mimics, power exo-suits, the detailed beach attack, the training room and the final Paris raid. We explore newly written Maya plugins and the toolsets behind animation, destruction and water sims in the film, overseen by production visual effects supervisor Nick Davis.

Edge of Tomorrow

For the dangerous and frenetic tentacled mimics, Imageworks took early designs and developed a Maya plug-in that dealt with the complicated tentacles and interpenetration issues. These alien creatures were envisaged as vicious beasts that could adapt their bodies – made up of fast moving tentacles – quickly to stage an attack. With the mimics, or ‘grunts’, appearing in Imageworks’ gamut of visual effects work in the film’s first two acts, the studio took initial designs created by Framestore, MPC and the production art department, plus previs by The Third Floor (see below) and implemented this into its pipeline.

“One of the production artists came up with a design that was completely made out of tentacles and he made a little maquette out of clay,” recalls Imageworks visual effects supervisor Daniel Kramer. “There were no solid structures whatsoever. It was like he took a bowl of spaghetti and you just formed that spaghetti into limbs and a body. What that meant was that the creature could completely change shape – it could spawn a limb or retract a limb or grow new tentacles within a limb. They would writhe against each other and slide against each other – it just had tentacles coming out where the head might be.”

“The thought was that there’s really no up or down or left or right to this creature,” adds Kramer. “So if it were running along the beach and wanted to turn around to attack somebody, rather than actually turning around, it might just invert its body – just suck it in and grow a limb out the other side. It was great idea, although it creates lots of challenges in terms of how do you actually do that!?”

FX Guide | Read the Full Article

How to Build Trust With Colleagues and Friends

A film crew has to have your back but how do you encourage teamwork and trust in a fast paced working environment. Bell Beth Cooper explores some tips on foster good working relationships.

A team

Why trust is important

Trust is surprising. We earn and offer so much of it without ever paying much attention. It’s beneficial for us to earn the trust of others but more importantly to be highly trusting of other people. People who trust more are less likely to be unhappy, cheat, steal or lie, more likely to make friends, respect the rights of others, and to give people a second chance. Being highly trusting isn’t the same as being gullible and those who trust more are not more likely to be gullible than those who don’t.

For a team of colleagues, trust can increase productivity by altering how we react to motivation to achieve results. Trust also plays a surprising role in communication—we’re more likely to hold back our own feelings about an issue when we don’t trust the person we’re sharing information with. This can affect how the other person understands the issue and can further break down trust in that relationship.

Trust is a tricky thing to understand because it’s intangible, but there are a few behaviors we can focus on to help increase the trust among our friends, colleagues or employees.

Pick Crew | Read the Full Article

Via Lifehacker

Ioan Allen describes the history of Dolby Sound

April 26, 2013. Ioan Allen, Senior Vice President, Dolby Laboratories will explore the role of sound in cinematic storytelling and the evolution of the film industry. Ioan led Dolby’s entry into the cinema in 1970 and helped to build a model that was successful in cinema, and relevant to other areas of entertainment — from broadcast to Blu-ray disc. Ioan will draw from his decades working with preeminent filmmakers and major studios to discuss both the growth of Dolby’s business and changes in the business of entertainment.

Ioan-Allen

Newer Posts
Older Posts