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Screenwriting

Improvising Screenplays: Three Stagnant Scene Types…and How to Make Them Flow

In Improvising Screenplays, improvisational actor Brett Wean shares how the concepts of improvisation can be applied to the work — and play — of writing your script. There are a few general, arbitrary-sounding, scene types that actors are told to avoid when first learning improv. Specifically, novice improvisers are warned to stay away from: argument Read MoreRead More

How to Build a Fictional World – TED-Ed

Why is J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings trilogy so compelling? How about The Matrix or Harry Potter? What makes these disparate worlds come alive are clear, consistent rules for how people, societies — and even the laws of physics — function in these fictional universes. Author Kate Messner offers a few tricks for you, Read MoreRead More

Walter Benjamin’s Rules for Writing

Here’s an excerpt from German literary Critic and writer Walter Bendix Schönflies Benjamin with tips for every writer. Walter Bendix Schönflies Benjamin was a German literary critic, philosopher, social critic, translator, radio broadcaster and essayist. Though he died in 1940, before film really took over the world, he compiled a list of rules for his Read MoreRead More

Interview with Arrested Development Creator: Mitch Hurwitz

In the first part of Pretentious Film Majors’ 2-part interview with Arrested Development creator Mitch Hurwitz, Mitch discusses some of his earliest influences, starting out on the Golden girls, and face stamping the Sandrabot. Find out what the creator of one of the funniest shows ever has to say about how he came up with Read MoreRead More

Carroll O’Connor Once told Norman Lear he would ’Never go Near’ this one “All in the Family” scene

Norman Lear tells Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric that Carroll O’Connor, the actor who played Archie Bunker, was not a fan of a scene that ended up being one of Lear’s favorite moments from “All in the Family”. Via Go Into The StoryRead More

25 Things Writers Should Know About Creating Mystery

Novelist and screenwriter Chuck Wendig covers a few things to keep in mind when writing a mystery. 1. YOUR STORY MUST BE AN INCOMPLETE EQUATION A complete equation is 4 + 5 = 9. It’s simple. Clean. And it’s already resolved. Stories are not simple. They are not clean. And we most certainly don’t want Read MoreRead More

5 Low Budget Feature Writing Tips

Joshua Caldwell is an MTV Movie Award winning director, writer, and producer. Here he breaks into 5 tips for writing a low budget feature film. Here are some things I’ve learned about writing a no-budget film: 1. Utilize modular storytelling. The easiest way to understand modular storytelling is to think of a movie camera (film Read MoreRead More

10 Reasons Your Screenplay Sucks (and how to fix it)

Karina Wilson explains 10 major reasons why your script just isn’t good enough Despite the hundreds of seminars, books and DVDs Field (along with McKee, Knopf, Voegler, Seger, Truby, Snyder et al) has contributed to teaching the science of screenwriting over the past four decades, it’s still a form that very few people manage to Read MoreRead More

The Psychology of Cryptomnesia: How We Unconsciously Plagiarize Existing Ideas

Maria Papova covers cognitive psychologist Ronald T. Kellogg’s theory on writing and originality. “Any experience the writer has ever suffered,”William Faulkner told a university audience in 1958, “is going to influence what he does, and that is not only what he’s read, but the music he’s heard, the pictures he’s seen.” This notion — that “our” ideas are the combinatorial product Read MoreRead More

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