Filmmaking 360

How Alfred Hitchcock Blocks A Scene

The Nerdwriter breaks down a scene from Hitchcock’s Vertigo to look for story clues in the blocking. I’m always troubled by these kinds of “readings” of movie scenes for two big reasons: (1) it assumes that Alfred Hitchcock was entirely responsible for the blocking and (2) that only Alfred Hitchcock is capable of that kind of Read MoreRead More

Face Swapping Technology Means You’ll Never Know What’s Real Ever Again

What if you can realistically control an actor’s face using only a basic webcam? The technology is quickly coming thanks to the researchers at Stanford University who just released a paper and video on some amazing real time face capture and Reenactment software. From Video description: We present a novel approach for real-time facial reenactment Read MoreRead More

Keynote with Mark Duplass from SxSW

Mark Duplass, a director, actor, writer, and producer, discusses the migration of filmmakers to television, to the emergence of VOD and its impact on micro-budget film. Duplass has eight pieces of advice for those who want to start a career in filmmaking. He also talks on the changing models of film and television distribution/production, how Read MoreRead More

No, 360 Video is Not Going to Replace Traditional Filmmaking, but It’s Still Cool as Hell

I’ve gotten several emails at Filmmaker IQ asking if 360 video is going to replace traditional filmmaking techniques. The answer of course is “NO!” -followed by a definitive “HELL NO!” but that doesn’t make 360 video still really cool. The funny thing is when this video came up in my browser I didn’t even know Read MoreRead More

New 9×16 Festival Could Showcase YOUR FILM at the Next Cannes!

In certain filmmaking crowds it is often expected of me, as a student of film history, to abhor the modern trend of vertical video or 9×16. But many people would be surprised to find out that I actually do not have a problem with the format at all. We take photos in portrait mode, we Read MoreRead More

Reels of classic films tend to melt into goo; philanthropist David W. Packard won’t let that happen

Kenneth Turan profiles David W. Packard and his Packard Humanities Institute has become one of the leading philanthropic organizations funding film preservation. If you care even a little about the art and history of American motion pictures, about being able to see classic films now and forever, you owe a debt of gratitude to David W. Read MoreRead More

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