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When Woody Allen first Got Serious

Scott Tobias looks at the time and place of Interiors (1978), Woody Allen’s first venture from comedy into dark drama. Before bringing Interiors into the world, Woody Allen spent a decade mastering a sophisticated form of low comedy, mingling the silly antics of the Marx brothers and Buster Keaton with the droll intellect of his stand-up and New Yorker magazine contributions. Read MoreRead More

Edgar Wright Talks ‘The World’s End,’ Completing The Cornetto Trilogy, ‘Ant-Man’ & Much More

Director/screenwriter Edgar Wright speaks about his Cornetto Trilogy which began with “Shaun of the Dead” and “Hot Fuzz” and concludes with “The World’s End”. All good things must come to an end, and this weekend, the “Three Flavors Cornetto Trilogy” finally melts with the debut of apocalyptic robo-comedy “The World’s End.” Beginning with 2004′s romantic Read MoreRead More

Heroines of Cinema: 15 Female Directors Who Made Their First Feature After Turning 40

Matthew Hammett Knott chronicles 15 women who broke into directing after turning 40. It seemed a more interesting approach to look at directors whose feature film career did not even begin until the age of forty or later. In last week’s article, a user wrote in the comments section of being an aspiring director in Read MoreRead More

Is Crowdfunding Changing the Game for Filmmakers? A Q&A With Spike Lee

Spike Lee’s Kickstarter is looking like it will be a success (thanks in no small part to a small but well off crowd who donated large sums). As the campaign is closing to end, Spike Lee sits down in an interview with Joe Vogel and his thoughts on the process. You’ve mentioned in other interviews that Read MoreRead More

American Masters: Mel Brooks – Make a Noise

After 60 years in show business, Mel Brooks has earned more major awards than any other living entertainer; he is one of 14 EGOT (Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony) winners. Yet, the comedy giant has energetically avoided a documentary profile being made, even issuing an informal gag order on his friends … until now. Watch Read MoreRead More

Billy Wilder’s Ten Rules of Filmmaking

In Conversations with Wilder, Cameron Crowe lays out Billy Wilder’s ten rules of Filmmaking: The audience is fickle. Grab ‘em by the throat and never let ‘em go. Develop a clean line of action for your leading character. Know where you’re going. The more subtle and elegant you are in hiding your plot points, the better Read MoreRead More

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